Excerpt 3: Motor Trends: Additive manufacturing drives production of race-ready cars

Prodrive's MINI John Cooper Works WRC race with 15 FDM parts.Even the largest race teams produce limited runs of cars during racing season. These low production volumes tend to drive up the cost of production, especially when tooling is required. The use of additive manufacturing (3D printing) to make parts for race cars provides the important advantage of being able to economically produce parts in volumes as low as one without the need for tooling.

"Motor Trends: Additive manufacturing drives production of race-ready cars" is a Stratasys white paper that discusses the use of additive manufacturing to produce race-ready parts. In the third excerpt, Chief Designer Paul Doe of the Prodrive FIA World Rally Championship (WRC) racing team discusses the advantage of Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) in low volume production.

Doe cites many advantages to additive manufacturing. Chief among them is cost. “We make only 25 cars per year, so it is hard to justify tooling costs. FDM eliminates tooling, which keeps cost down and shortens response time,” he said. As a designer, he also likes that Prodrive can manufacture anything that his crew dreams up, which optimizes performance. “We’re not limited by normal constraints, such as how to de-mold a part from a tool. This opens up new directions and new opportunities for our designs.”

View or download the complete "Motor Trends: Additive manufacturing drives production of race-ready cars" white paper.

View the first excerpt previously posted the week of May 28th.

View the second excerpt previously posted the week of June 4th.

Leave a Comment

*