ER Blast from the Past: 3D Printed Running Charger Takes 3rd Place

This post is the first in a series of profiles on previous Stratasys Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge participants and their instructors. To learn more about this year’s competition, click here.

Horse and human forms merge to create Meaker's “Running Charger”, 3D printed with Stratasys uPrint

Horse and human forms merge to create Meaker’s “Running Charger”, 3D printed with a uPrint 3D Printer

School spirit and appreciation for his running coaches inspired Max Meaker’s “Running Charger,” which won 3rd place in the Art and Architecture category of the 2013 Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge. His winning entry blended the profiles of a runner and a horse — the mascot of his alma mater, Kentridge High School – into a 3D sculpture. This unique design allows the viewer to see both figures in the sculpture, depending on his or her perspective. Check out the video Max submitted along with his entry to see what we mean.

Kentridge High School received a uPrint SE 3D Printer during Max’s senior year. Having taken engineering classes since freshman year, he was involved in helping to set up the 3D printer and was soon 3D printing models he designed using SolidWorks.

Max Meaker with his winning entry of ‘Running Charger’ 3D printed with Stratasys uPrint

Max Meaker with his winning entry of ‘Running Charger’ 3D printed with a uPrint 3D Printer

“My favorite part about the Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge was getting to think outside the box and create something unique,” Max said. “With 3D printing, the only limitation on what you can create is your imagination. The biggest challenge I had in this competition was my original design being too complicated and unrealistic.”

Max is now a student at Western Washington University in Bellingham, Washington, where he plans to major in Manufacturing Engineering Technology. He’s also already planning his submission for this year’s contest. Max hints that his entry will involve “…an interesting combination of 3D printed parts, electronics, and servos, but you’ll have to wait to see what it does.”

extreme-redesign-logoHave you ever looked at a gadget and thought that a few tweaks could improve it? Wanted to customize an ordinary object to make it something extraordinary? Do you have a design itch that needs scratching? Enter the 2014 Stratasys Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge! You don’t even need to have access to a 3D printer to enter.  Entries must be submitted in the form of a 3D-printable STL file and will be judged on creativity, practicality and mechanical function. Click here for more contest details.

This post is also available in: Chinese (Simplified), Japanese, Spanish, Korean, Portuguese (Brazil)

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