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Winston Hendrickson, VP Creative Media Solutions at Adobe Software, featuring one of the models from the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer by Stratasys

From Auto Racing to Fashion and Everything in Between, Stratasys Shines at London 3D Printshow

The third annual London 3D Printshow wrapped up Saturday. This year’s show highlighted the artistic aspects of 3D printing in the Art Gallery section, in collaboration with show sponsor Adobe, as well as a Music Room filled with 3D printed instruments for visitors to test. A Hospital Area featured advancements in implants and bioprinting, along with regenerative medicine applications and medical modeling. Stratasys partners and customers highlighted some of their favorite 3D prints, and one even took home an award.

Noa Raviv and “Hard Copy”

Set to create a stir, emerging fashion designer Noa Raviv showcased two stunning outfits from her award-winning “Hard Copy” collection that incorporated Stratasys 3D printed multi-material elements. 

noa raviv 3d printshow award
Left, Noa Raviv being interviewed about the “Hard Copy” Collection at the 3D Printshow printed by Stratasys, Noa won the “Fashion Designer of the Year” Award for her 3D Printed Designs, right

“Hard Copy” is a seven-piece dress collection featuring black-and-white ruffled fabrics and grid-like patterns that form voluminous shapes. The collection includes a stunning black dress that incorporates a 3D printed, multi-material element created on the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer by Stratasys. The final non-symmetrical 3D piece was 3D printed with Rigid Opaque (VeroWhite and VeroBlackPlus) 3D printing materials in one simultaneous print job, and then stitched onto the dress to create a kind of optical illusion between 2D and 3D patterns. More details on the project, and a behind the scenes video, were featured recently on the blog.

For her work with the 3D printed fashion designs, Raviv was honored at the show with an award for Fashion Designer of the Year.

Strakka Racing

The World Endurance Championship Strakka DOME S103 LMP2 race car featured at the 3D Printshow with a number of Stratasys 3D printed parts at left, with its smaller 3D Printed model at right
The World Endurance Championship Strakka DOME S103 LMP2 race car featured at the 3D Printshow with a number of Stratasys 3D printed parts at left, with its smaller 3D Printed model at right

British motor racing team Strakka Racing exemplifies how 3D printing technology is driving design and engineering with its ultra-cool World Endurance Championship Strakka DOME S103 LMP2 race car. The racing team’s use of Stratasys 3D printing touches all areas of its part production process – from wind-tunnel testing of scale model parts to fully-functional prototypes, as well as 3D printed end-use parts used directly on the S103 LMP2 car in an actual race environment. A number of 3D printed parts from both the race car and wind tunnel development program were displayed at the show including a race ready cockpit dashboard panel and rear wing spoiler, track test parts such as brake ducts and dive planes, along with wind tunnel aerodynamic components.

National Health Service and Replica 3dm

Cranium surgical model produced on a Stratasys Objet30 Pro 3D Printer, used to validate patient surgery prior to the operation
Cranium surgical model produced on a Stratasys Objet30 Pro 3D Printer, used to validate patient surgery prior to the operation

Replica 3DM‘s surgical models are cutting costs and improving patient outcomes for the NHS. Stratasys Objet24 and Objet30 Pro 3D Printers convert patient CT scans into physical 3D printed models that are used as surgical guides to test implants for size and fit pre-surgery. This includes re-bending of titanium implant plates to the patient’s exact specifications and preoperative investigations across maxillofacial, orthopedics, neurology, spinal and ears, nose and throat wards, to identify the correct procedure and improve outcome. The company also produces a number of cranioplasty models in which the unaffected side of the patient’s face is mirrored to produce a 3D printed reconstruction, prior to the fitting and placement of a titanium plate.

Originally established as a 3D modeling department of Salisbury District Hospital, Replica 3DM has since extended its medical 3D printing capabilities to NHS hospitals across the UK, primarily offering its services to Trusts that do not have in-house access to 3D printers.

“To us, 3D printing and the medical profession go hand-in-hand, particularly in the planning of complicated procedures,” explains Matthew Sherry, Managing Director and Founder of Replica 3DM. “A 3D model equips surgeons with a hands-on perspective which cannot be achieved by looking at a computer screen. They can easily rotate, inspect and analyze each surgical procedure on a case-by-case basis, enabling them to pre-bend implants knowing that they will perfectly fit the patient. This is instrumental in eliminating potential problems during operations and can be used as a visual aid when explaining the surgical procedure to patients.”

Sherry said the ability to use 3D printed models to pre-bend titanium implants has reduced surgery time significantly.

“In the past, surgeons would depend on surgical experience to fit the plates during surgery. This could not only be quite costly, it may also crucially require longer patient anesthesia times,” he explains. “As demonstrated in a recent maxillofacial procedure at Salisbury District Hospital, the ability to pre-bend the titanium plate prior to surgery enabled surgeons to secure the perfect custom fit. This reduced the number of incisions required and overall theatre time, directly impacting the quality of patient care.

Adobe Software

Winston Hendrickson, VP Creative Media Solutions at Adobe Software, featuring one of the models from the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer by Stratasys
Winston Hendrickson, VP Creative Media Solutions at Adobe Software, featuring one of the models from the Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer by Stratasys

3D printing continues to push the boundaries of art and fashion by enabling designers to directly manufacture pieces previously not possible with traditional methods. Continuing this trend, visitors to the 3D Printshow were treated to 3D printed pieces from a selection of artists and designers that were produced using Stratasys’ recently-launched Objet500 Connex3 3D Printer multi-color multi-material system.

Winston Hendrickson, VP of Creative Media Solutions at Adobe, explained why Stratasys 3D Printers were used to create the models in the Adobe Art and Fashion Gallery.

“We chose to collaborate with Stratasys on creating the products for this show specifically because the Objet500 Connex3 is the only 3D printer that is able to print brilliant color across multiple materials and it has an accuracy that allows for complex geometries,” Hendrickson said.

Representing the best of 3D printed art is London-based designer, Assa Ashuach, and Belgian artist Nick Ervinck, both showcasing color multi-material 3D printing. Ashuach’s Interior Journey designs explore various expressions of geometry and aesthetics, while Ervinck unveiled GNILICER, a complex structure with various intertwining elements that combine transparency and striking color.

“Once again, the comprehensive array of attention-grabbing 3D printing applications on display at this years’ 3D Printshow firmly underlines how the technology is touching all stages of product development, across a seemingly limitless range of sectors,” said Arita Mattsoff, VP Marketing at Stratasys. “Whether it’s the realization of a simple concept model early in the design process or the production of a fully-functional prototype for testing, or the growing number of customers who are directly manufacturing end-use parts, Stratasys 3D printing has become an essential tool in the manufacturing toolbox.”

This post is also available in: Portuguese (Brazil)

Carrie Wyman

Carrie Wyman

Carrie is a technology and 3D printing enthusiast, with a passion for beautiful design.

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