Stratasys Blog

Healthy Advice for Medical Device Development: Try 3D Printed Injection Molds

3D printed injection molding may just be the greatest thing since sliced bread. Case after case we’re seeing significant savings in both time and costs. These winds of change have reached the folks working in medical device development and leading the charge is design and development company, Worrell.

Worrell is accelerating the development of medical devices by moving away from traditional molding tools and into 3D printed injection molding (what Worrell refers to as 3D IM). Why are they taking the additive manufacturing plunge? Well, it’s fairly simple: production time reduced by a whopping 95%. Oh, and have we mentioned the savings? At 30% of the cost of traditional aluminum molds. the move is cost effective too!

injectionmold-comparisonIn the words of infomercial king Billy Mays, “But wait! There’s more!”  Together with Worrell, we will be appearing at international trade shows and jointly hosting a series of workshops to educate others in the medical industry on this innovative process and how much it will impact medical manufacturing.

“We have recognized a significant underutilization of the 3D printed injection molding process in medical device development and we’re working with Worrell to help fill this gap,” says Nadav Sella, Senior Manager of Manufacturing Tools at Stratasys. “Worrell is a leading design firm with the expertise and infrastructure necessary to integrate injection molding and 3D printing within the product development cycle. In an industry where products have the potential to save lives, we want to use this collaboration to demonstrate how medical device manufacturers can bring their products to market significantly faster than ever before.”

medical devices 3d printed injection molding
3D printed injection molds can efficiently produce medical device prototypes in the final material, in this case, Polycarbonate

Now, we know what you’re thinking. How do 3D printed molds affect the FDA approval process? Worrell uses an Objet500 Connex color multi-material 3D Printer to create the Digital ABS molds and then injects the same materials that will be used in a finished medical device, (in this case polycarbonate) creating higher-fidelity prototypes.

“Using 3D IM, we are able to create a prototype for a fraction of the cost and in a matter of days compared to the eight-week lead time associated with traditional tooling processes.” said Kai Worrell, CEO at Worrell. “This revolutionary manufacturing process enabled by Stratasys PolyJet 3D printing technology is now an integral part of our product development cycle, allowing us to provide better prototypes for care providers, while saving our clients considerable time and money.”

This seems like a pretty great step in medical device prototyping. We’re looking forward to seeing a lot more out of this very exciting partnership.

This post is also available in: Portuguese (Brazil)

Carrie Wyman

Carrie Wyman

Carrie is a technology and 3D printing enthusiast, with a passion for beautiful design.

3 comments

  • I would like to know the cost of Objet500 Connex color multi-material 3D Printer.
    Regards,
    Abraham Chia

    • Can you let us know what you’d like to use this for so we can ensure the right person gets in touch with you?

      • Print molds for injection pieces in this blog posted it a project for a company that used to manufacture propellers, the manufacturing interests em
        Regards,
        Abraham Chia

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