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Two Weeks Left to Enter Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge

The  12th Annual Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge deadline is just over two weeks away, and the momentum continues to build for this year’s competition.

Stratasys Extreme Redesign winner in Secondary Education Engineering, Thomas Vagnini of Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School (Franklin, MA), presents the HUNCH 2015 Zero Gravity Scale at AET Labs semi-finals competition last year.
Stratasys Extreme Redesign winner in Secondary Education Engineering, Thomas Vagnini of Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School (Franklin, MA), presents the HUNCH 2015 Zero Gravity Scale at AET Labs semi-finals competition last year.

As the demand for qualified entry-level engineers, technicians and designers continues to rise, STEM educators are turning to education challenges like Extreme Redesign to engage students and supplement their curriculum. So far, this year’s competition has experienced a 44% increase in student participation and entries represent  students from around the globe, including the United States, India, Mexico, Hong Kong, Canada and Australia.

Since its introduction, the Extreme Redesign 3D Printing Challenge has awarded over $140,000 in student scholarships. Challenge topics include ‘Art and Architecture,’ ‘Engineering: Post-Secondary,’ and ‘Engineering: Secondary Education.’ New to this year’s challenge is the addition of a bonus category titled ‘Make a Difference,’ which challenges students to apply their designs to help shape peoples’ lives.

Educators new to the design challenge often wonder how others leverage the competition in the classroom. In what ways do they inspire students to participate in activities that will test them with some of the STEM-related skills required in today’s workforce?

Dustin Ricci, CADD teacher at Windsor High School in Connecticut, mentored six of his students during last year’s Challenge and offered advice to teachers who are new to the experience.

“My motto in the program is to keep it real. The class had to come up with an original idea inspired by a problem they’ve encountered in their everyday lives,” said Ricci. “Students are way more engaged in the class if they’re working on something that they’re interested in.”

Students are also motivated by the potential of winning up to $2,500 (USD) scholarship prizes. The free Extreme Redesign Challenge t-shirt that all entrants receive doesn’t hurt either.

“Elsik High School is a Title 1 school. For some, that is the only new apparel they will have for the school year.  Believe me they wear them proudly and often,” said Betty Reese, PLTW Engineering Instructor.

New England Area Participants’ Opportunity to Shine in Semi-finals Competition

CADD teacher Dustin Ricci inspired students to develop solutions to real-world problems. These FDM 3D printed ski pole clips were developed by a student to prevent skiers from dropping poles while on the chairlift.
CADD teacher Dustin Ricci inspired students to develop solutions to real-world problems. These FDM 3D printed ski pole clips were developed by a student to prevent skiers from dropping poles while on the chairlift.

Returning again this year is the 2nd Annual Extreme Redesign Challenge: New England Regional Semi-finals. Hosted by Stratasys reseller, AET Labs, New England-based high school students will be recognized and awarded prizes based on their innovation and creativity.

The free public event will be hosted at Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts, on Wednesday, March 2.

Last year’s Secondary Education Engineering winner, Thomas Vagnini, and runner-up, Josh Fuller, both of Tri-County Regional Vocational Technical High School, participated in last year’s semi-finals competition. Both students presented their designs – a 3D-printed, zero-gravity mixer and zero-gravity scale – produced for NASA’s HUNCH program to assist astronauts in outer space.

Vagnini offered his advice to future contestants: “Make sure you do something useful and make sure to do something very unique that appeals to you.”

Want to learn more?

Watch the highlight reel from last year’s semi-finals competition, which includes testimonials from CADD teacher, Dustin Ricci. View the contest rules or enter here.

Sign up to receive updates on the Extreme Redesign Challenge.

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