Latest Posts

3d printed goggles video

Color 3D Printed Goggles – an Awesomely Rapid Ride from Design to Prototype to Production

UK design consultancy and Stratasys customer DesignReality put their Objet500 Connex3 Color Multi-material 3D Printer to the test recently by 3D printing two pairs of full-color goggles, rugged enough for field testing. DesignReality got its s … [Read More...]

3d printed hoseless robotic gripper

3D Printed Robotic Gripper: Smarter Design, Faster Delivery, Better Value for Customer

Digital Mechanics AB of Sweden combines its design and engineering experience with rapid prototyping technology to tackle challenging projects. Often the work demands more than a prototype. Recently, an injection molding customer asked Digital Mechan … [Read More...]

robosub 3d printed mcgill robotics

McGill’s RoboSub Torpedoes Design Boundaries with 3D Printing

McGill Robotics will take part in the 17th Annual International RoboSub Competition, July 28 - August 3, 2014 Bringing together over 100 students from more than a dozen university disciplines, the McGill Robotics team is fired up for their nex … [Read More...]

Featured Post

steelblue-thumbnail

Stratasys 3D Printing Gives Architects Finer Details and More Display Options for 2017 San Francisco Skyline

Steelblue and Autodesk recently introduced the largest ever 3D printed model of the San Francisco skyline, 3D printed on two Objet500 Connex Multi-material 3D Printers by Stratasys. Projecting the planned skyline in 2017 … [Read More...]

Engineering Corner

Excerpt 4: Justifying Additive Manufacturing through Jigs & Fixtures

Rp+m is a strategic partner of Thogus, a custom plastic injectin molder. Rp+m uses additive manufacturing a.k.a 3D printing to produce 3D-printed 5S production aids that are crucial in Thogus’ push for operational efficiency. 5S is a method of maintaining a neat and orderly work space that places al … [Read More...]

Excerpt 3: Justifying Additive Manufacturing through Jigs & Fixtures

Oreck, a manufacturer of commercial and consumer vacuums, was an early adopter of direct digital manufacturing or rapid manufacturing by building jigs and fixtures with what was then called a rapid prototype machine. Whether used for prototyping or manufacturing, the equipment is now known as an add … [Read More...]

Excerpt 2: Justifying Additive Manufacturing through Jigs & Fixtures

Digi, the wireless networking device manufacturer, originally justified the purchase of an additive manufacturing (AM) machine based on savings from rapid prototyping. Within a year of purchasing a FDM machine, however, Digi expanded its use into applications such as building fixtures with integrate … [Read More...]